Scenes From A Tropical Plant Sale


Spring in South Florida is plant sale season. Cities and garden clubs throughout the region are hosting sales of flowering shrubs, palms, exotics, and native plants — and very often, gardeners drive a long way to find their perfect plant, a great deal, or both.

Fortunately for me, the Tropical Plant Sale in Wilton Manors, FL, was only about a 7-minute drive. There, on the grounds of a historic house and under a canopy of palms, I  lost myself among the vendors lining the paths. It was a cool (in South Florida terms) morning, and the rainbow of colors looked especially fresh and crisp.

Naturally, since this is South Florida, orchids stole the show. In fact, my only purchase was an orchid with small burgundy blooms in a white-glazed ceramic pot.

A South Florida plant sale and farmers’ market wouldn’t be complete without a large assortment of locally produced honey.

I literally stopped in my tracks and gasped when I spotted this bromeliad.

Tucked among the assortment of orchids and bromeliads were a few surprises, some of which were old friends and others that were new-to-me surprises.

Oxalis just makes me smile.

This iris was so close to blooming.

A display of hanging pots filled with pitcher plants.

When I saw this climber, Monkey’s Brush, for the first time, I had to steady myself.

Anthurium.

While I have your attention, I wanted to send a special thank you to my friend and fellow blogger, Alesiablogs.wordpress.com. She wrote and posted a lovely review of my book Seeing Green, and I’m so happy she enjoyed it and was moved to write about it.

If you would like to win a free copy, simply leave a comment here about spring. What’s your favorite part about spring? How do you prepare your garden? What is a favorite spring gardening memory? Do you have a spring gardening hack you would like to share? (If you left a similar comment on the previous post, you’re off the hook on this one. You’re already entered to win a copy.) The deadline to leave a comment is April 16.

Bloomin’ Update 61: Seeing Red, White, Purple, & “Green”


I can’t think of a better way to celebrate the arrival of spring than with a display of vibrant colors, a site for eyes sore from the dreary grays of winter. Even South Florida, often accused of not actually having a change of seasons, wants to get in on the spring act.

Perhaps I’ve been here long enough to notice the subtle changes as winter slips into spring. Perhaps I’ve been here long enough to feel that 83 degrees in spring is warmer than 83 degrees in winter and cooler than 83 degrees in summer.  Whatever it is, though, there is something definitely in the air. Orchids and flowering subtropical shrubs and a book that’s perfect for all seasons are all putting on a show.

Since moving to Florida, I’ve noticed other gardens where orchids were tied to trees, their colorful, showy flowers cascading downward. This past year, I gave it a try.

The first step was to choose orchids not in flower. I selected plants given to me by friends or the ones I found after raiding the clearance racks in the garden center of the box store where I worked.

I used floral tape to secure an orchid to the tree, packing some moss around the roots of the plant and making sure the plant would not be in direct sunlight. Then, I had to be patient.

If the orchid is happy, its roots eventually take hold of the trunk — creeping downward and around, absorbing moisture from the air and rain.

This spring, I was rewarded when one of the plants bloomed.

In a nearby tree, another flower spike appeared and a white orchid opened.

On a shepherd’s hook, an epidendrum orchid also decided to send up a flower cluster of miniature flowers.

Orchids, though, were not the only plants putting on a show for spring. In a recent post about my aging green thumbs, I mentioned that I’m using dwarf varieties of flowering shrubs.

Dwarf Jatropha.

Dwarf Chenille.

Dwarf Powderpuff.

And the gout plant also decided to share its waxy cluster of flowers.

Pineapples — both ornamental and edible — all seemed to have the same idea this spring.

Ornamental Pineapple.

Edible Pineapple.

Perhaps the biggest news I have for this first full day of spring is that I have self-published a book of some of my most favorite blog posts and photos, Seeing Green: Life Learned In The Potting Shed

When I first thought about compiling blog posts into book format, my hope was to create a book that I would like to read. I wanted something that could carry a gardener through the frozen days of winter and the sultry days of summer. I wanted a book that could inspire, a book that could make readers laugh and nod along — and I wanted it to have pictures.

For self-publishing, I decided to go with Blurb, a format known for photo books. The quality of Blurb’s print-on-demand service is clearly evident on the 144 pages. The pictures are clear and colorful, and the words are easy on the eyes — and in the end, I think I accomplished what I set out to do.

Now for the fun stuff — the nitty gritty, if you will. There are two ways to get your own copy of Seeing Green, which is available in hardcover and softcover.

To win a copy of Seeing Green, just leave a comment about spring. What do you love about it? What are you looking forward to doing? How do you prep your garden? Do you have a spring gardening hack you would like to share? What is your favorite spring memory? If it’s about spring, just let me know — and you have until April 16 to do it. A winner will be randomly selected.

To purchase a copy (or more) of Seeing Green, please visit my Blurb store.

Thank you for your support and encouragement, your wisdom and comments — and thank you for following me in my New York garden and for joining me on my new adventures in Florida.

Field Trip: Tree Tops Park


When I first heard of Tree Tops Park, I imagined a public park with treehouses and tree walkways to give visitors a bird’s-eye view among the branches and canopy. In reality, the only thing to climb is an observation tower — otherwise, visitors keep their feet on the ground and look upward. No matter how you look at them, though, the trees at Tree Tops Park are tops.

Continue reading

A Cure For The Wintertime Blues


This is the time of year when I feel the most out of step with my fellow gardeners and the readers of this blog. You see, this is the start of South Florida’s growing season — the orchids (above) are currently blooming in my garden. Nurseries are overflowing with plant selections and cold fronts bring delightful weather rather than snow and ice.

Continue reading

Field Trip: Fern Forest Nature Center


Hidden beneath the asphalt and manicured communities, the condo towers and man-made canals of southeastern Florida, there is Old Florida — very, very Old Florida.  It’s the Florida that existed long before Henry Flagler built the railroad that opened this region of the state to developers.  It is, perhaps, the Florida that greeted the first settlers.

That idea is what inspired a group of scientists from Florida Atlantic University and Broward Community College.  It was 1979, and their article, “A Tropical Fern Grotto In Broward County,” was published in the American Fern Journal.  That 247-acre grotto was actually a remnant of how Broward County once looked.  More than 30 species of ferns were found living among  200+ species of other plants, all of which inhabited swamp forests, hammocks, pinelands, and prairie ecosystems.

As a result, the land was made a Designated Urban Wilderness Area and named Fern Forest Nature Center.  Walking through the habitat, on both boardwalks and natural paths, allows visitors to take a step back in Florida history.

Much of Florida sits on limestone. Here, large moss-covered chunks make up the floor of the habitat.

The prairie habitat is adjacent to . . .

. . . the swamp habitat, where the leaves of swamp plants resemble leaves on the reflected branches.

Just about ready to bloom.

A convict caterpillar, which will eventually become a Spanish moth.

Cypress trees make up a large number of the plants growing in the swamp forest. They’re easy to identify because of their “knees.”

A close-up of cypress knees.

Air plant colonies are well established along the branches of many of the trees.

More air plants.

The habitat provides food and shelter for wildlife, either alone . . .

. . . or the whole family.

Fern spores on the underside of a frond.

Marlberry.

Vines are quite happy here.

I’m not sure of this plant’s identity (it could be the invasive Brazilian Pepper Tree) — I just thought it looked like it was ready for the holidays.

Fern Forest Nature Center is located at 201 Lyons Road, Coconut Creek, FL 33063. It’s open from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., seven days a week, except for some holidays. Check out their calendar for various events.