Scenes From A Tropical Plant Sale


Spring in South Florida is plant sale season. Cities and garden clubs throughout the region are hosting sales of flowering shrubs, palms, exotics, and native plants — and very often, gardeners drive a long way to find their perfect plant, a great deal, or both.

Fortunately for me, the Tropical Plant Sale in Wilton Manors, FL, was only about a 7-minute drive. There, on the grounds of a historic house and under a canopy of palms, I  lost myself among the vendors lining the paths. It was a cool (in South Florida terms) morning, and the rainbow of colors looked especially fresh and crisp.

Naturally, since this is South Florida, orchids stole the show. In fact, my only purchase was an orchid with small burgundy blooms in a white-glazed ceramic pot.

A South Florida plant sale and farmers’ market wouldn’t be complete without a large assortment of locally produced honey.

I literally stopped in my tracks and gasped when I spotted this bromeliad.

Tucked among the assortment of orchids and bromeliads were a few surprises, some of which were old friends and others that were new-to-me surprises.

Oxalis just makes me smile.

This iris was so close to blooming.

A display of hanging pots filled with pitcher plants.

When I saw this climber, Monkey’s Brush, for the first time, I had to steady myself.

Anthurium.

While I have your attention, I wanted to send a special thank you to my friend and fellow blogger, Alesiablogs.wordpress.com. She wrote and posted a lovely review of my book Seeing Green, and I’m so happy she enjoyed it and was moved to write about it.

If you would like to win a free copy, simply leave a comment here about spring. What’s your favorite part about spring? How do you prepare your garden? What is a favorite spring gardening memory? Do you have a spring gardening hack you would like to share? (If you left a similar comment on the previous post, you’re off the hook on this one. You’re already entered to win a copy.) The deadline to leave a comment is April 16.

A Cure For The Wintertime Blues


This is the time of year when I feel the most out of step with my fellow gardeners and the readers of this blog. You see, this is the start of South Florida’s growing season — the orchids (above) are currently blooming in my garden. Nurseries are overflowing with plant selections and cold fronts bring delightful weather rather than snow and ice.

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Kaboom Moments: When Gardens Go Bang!


I’m kicking myself — again.  This time, it’s all because I forgot to bring my camera to a July 4th fireworks show.  It would have been a great opportunity to play with the fireworks feature on my camera.

That’s what I was lamenting when I noticed these white begonia blooms.  Kaboom!

Begonia

The begonia story actually began last summer, when they were planted in a narrow strip along the north side of the house.  Fast forward through a hurricane, freezing winter temperatures, a blizzard that dumped three feet of snow, and spring, when I noticed small green leaves poking up in a bed of dead begonias.

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A Letter to Santa Claus


Dear Santa,

How are things where you are?  I know it’s been a while since I last wrote to you, but I have run out of options and I am turning to you and your elves to make this little gardener’s Christmas wish list become a reality.

I don’t know if you’ve had a chance to keep up with your reading, but a few posts ago, I wrote about the lack of G on HGTV.  Far be it from me to tell  you how to do your job, but you may want to consider a stocking full of coal for the network’s naughty executives.  They have not been kind to the gardening population — and, in fact, they have not responded to my letter requesting more G shows.

But if you would like to avoid coal, might I suggest sprinkling them with some inspiring Christmas magic so they may wake on Christmas morning like a renewed Ebenezer Scrooge?   To help you, here are a few ideas for gardening shows that I, for one, would love to watch on a snowy winter morning.

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Celebrating The Good Old Summer Time


Aaaahhhh.  The Summer Solstice.  For me, it’s a reminder of just how little we are.  Just think about it.  As we go about our ordinary lives, our giant orb revolves and rotates in a celestial dance, rewarding northerners with the longest day and shortest night.  (Of course, the pessimist in me says, “Great, now the days start to get shorter, the nights longer, and winter is just around the corner.”  Quite a jump, I know.) 

The Three Village Garden Club held their judged flower show at the Neighborhood House in Setauket, Long Island.

In any event, it’s no wonder that ancient Druids to modern-day beachgoers celebrate this day.  That’s why I took up my friend Rachel’s invitation to attend a judged flower show, hosted by her Three Village Garden Club on Long Island and scheduled to coincide with the Summer Solstice.

Although I do consider myself a gardener, I am of the backyard variety.  Garden club members, though, are a whole other breed of gardener.  I mean, I like to garden, usually for myself and Joe.  Garden club members take it to a competitive level, and the Three Village Garden Club is no exception.  These gardeners know latin and common names, and they carefully drive their entries, each in small glass vases, to the competition.  I get upset when my grocery bag with the milk falls over when I make a left turn — can you imagine if my hydrangea entry took a spill?

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