Bloomin’ Update 47: Last Call


Every garden should have hydrangeas for no-matter-the-season interest.

Every garden should have hydrangeas for no-matter-the-season interest.

I admit I have a hard time letting go of summer.

Even with leaves changing and falling and blooms fading and browning, I’m still reluctant to clean the beds and put them to rest.  Even the weather is having a difficult time falling into a seasonal rhythm.  There are days that are windy and evenings that are slightly frosty, and then there are the times when it feels mild and balmy.

So, with camera in hand, it’s last call in the garden, one last chance for flowers to bask in the spotlight before a hard frost takes them away.

A few zinnias are still holding on, their bright red petals shining more brightly above foliage painted with powdery mildew.

A few zinnias are still holding on, their bright red petals
shining more brightly above foliage painted with powdery mildew.

Their throats looking as if they held a bright light.

A few months ago, morning glories covered the trellis,
their throats looking as if they held a bright light.

Today, seed pods are all that remain.

Today, seed pods are all that remain.

The gaillardia, started from seed several years ago, continue to flower.

The gaillardia, started from seed several years ago, continue to flower . . .

Although some are in various stages of seed production.

. . . although some are in various stages of seed production.

Gaillardia at the end of the season.

Gaillardia at the end of the season.

Begonias in pastel pink look  fresh but a bit out of place in a world turning to shades of gold and orange.

Begonias in pastel pink look fresh but a bit out of place
in a world turning to shades of gold and orange.

Marigolds are still ablaze.

Marigolds are still ablaze.

A petunia, reseeded from last summer, is hoping to bloom on borrowed time.

A petunia, reseeded from last summer, hopes to bloom on borrowed time.

Hydrangeas age so gracefully in the fall garden.

Hydrangeas age so gracefully in the fall garden.

It was a great season.

It was a great season.

Faded glory.

Faded glory.

26 thoughts on “Bloomin’ Update 47: Last Call

    • Hey Alesia. That’s a but annoying. We had some windy weather the other day. Fortunately, the power lines didn’t come down. Leaves, yes; but not the power. Hope it eases up for you soon.

    • Hi Mario. I know what you mean. I had that same feeling this morning when I walked past one of the front beds, a tree stump is hidden by other plantings — and there, poking up from one of the cracks in the trunk, a small plant lived, rooting in the smallest amount of dirt that had settled in the crack. Amazing!

  1. I agree Hydrangeas bring something special to a garden. The seed pod picture is fantastic! I don’t do much cleaning up this time of year but it does make spring cleanup seem like more of an ordeal.

  2. Kevin, have you read the book: The Last Algonquin ? It is a true story about the last….Algonquin to live in the New York City area. A young boy meets him and ends up spending quite a bit of time listening to his stories…..back ~ 1920’s. The book was written by the son of the had-been young boy who spent time and learned some of the old ‘Indian ways’ from his Indian friend. Each season is so important in this story, especially the fall….and Indian Summer… so named for a very good reason.

  3. Beautiful pictures. You’re lucky to still have a bit of summer hanging on.
    I also fight letting go. Not until the annuals are frozen mush do I finally cut stuff down.

  4. I really identify with your feelings about the end of summer and the transitions taking place in the garden. On one hand I really hate to see the blooms fade and petals drop, but I love to watch the seed pods develop. I think it’s time for both of us to begin planning for next spring! Your photos are really wonderful, Kevin!

    • Hi Debra. There is something quite beautiful about seed pods — or is that just me convincing myself to embrace the changes. Either way, I can’t stop the change and there is something beautiful in all of life’s stages. Be well!

    • Hi Lee. As gardeners, we will do what we must do to survive the colder weather. A time to rest. A time to plan. A time to reflect. I’m glad you enjoyed the photos — I’m planning to show a few more on the brilliant leaves that are now falling like confetti.

    • Hi Cindy. It’s so sad when the heat gets to them — but I love the small green blooms in spring, the colors in summer, and the antiqued hues in fall. An amazing plant for the landscape.

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