Field Trip: Local Color At The Farmers Market


Farmers Market

A few posts ago, I lamented the fact that I was to be a garden blogger without a garden.  Imagine my delight, though, when I read in the local paper that Oakland Park, FL, has a weekly Farmers Market.  In fact, it’s just one of the many towns in south Florida with a Farmers Market.  Suddenly, I’m a garden blogger among gardeners.

Join me for a sunset stroll among the stalls, when the warm light and aromas helped turn what’s usually a vacant field into a painter’s palette of home-grown, home-made, organic food.

The first vendor that caught my eye was Jeff’s Produce.  It was a banquet of vegetables and fruit in the most brilliant of colors.  Sadly, there is no website for the farm — just a sentence from one of the men behind the tables that the farm is located on the Florida’s Gulf Coast.

Farmers Market

Tables of plenty.

Tomatoes.

Beets.

Beets.

Radishes.

Radishes.

Yams.

Yams.

Now that we’ve had our fill of produce, are you in the mood for something sweet?  How about some raw Florida honey?

Honey.

Honey.

For me, I’ll have some of the homemade jams and jellies, which take on jewel-like tones in the setting sunlight.  These were produced by Crafted House.

Jams and jellies.

Jams and jellies.

We may have sampled the sweets, but it’s never too late to plan for tomorrow night’s meal.  Just beyond the Crafted House booth is Pappardelle’s, which features a huge assortment of variously shaped and colorful pastas, many of them gluten-free.  The company is so new there is not yet a website.

Pastas.

Pastas.

Pasta shapes and colors.

Pasta shapes and colors.

After strolling through the stalls, can you think of anything else that could make this evening even more memorable and enjoyable?

Farmers Market.

Farmers Market.

Remember that newspaper clipping that advertised this weekly Farmers Market?  Well, there was another listing on that same page — the local garden club is holding its meeting (featuring a talk with the head of the local extension office), and the community center is just about a block north of here.

Interested in taking a walk and making it a garden of a night?

46 thoughts on “Field Trip: Local Color At The Farmers Market

    • It’s great that they schedule the market at the end of the day. They catch a lot of people heading home from work, or those who just want to nibble outdoors. And the warm setting sun also helped!

    • Ha Ha! Actually, I’m missing the hydrangeas and the thrill of seeing the first bits of green pushing up through the ground — but there’s still a lot of snow that must melt before they can be seen.

  1. Oh!!! NGD!! Yay!! So glad you found this treat. And the extension office meeting sounds like a delightful field trip too! I hope this wonderful, sunny, happy experience put a burst of sunshine in your heart. I pictured you and Joe rambling happily up the aisles of the market.
    Happy for you

    • Hi Maureen. That’s so true! I’m not sure if it’s me or all gardeners experience this, but I feel a definite rush when a see green. It’s good for the gardener’s soul. 🙂

  2. Hi Kevin. So glad to see that you are settling in! Sounds like you have the best of both worlds…..Florida for a while, then back up to your garden in the north. Enjoy!

  3. It looks like you’ve found a happy place!!! Exciting things ahead and NO SNOW to shovel!! That tri-colored pasta looked delish. I’m glad you guys are settling in and discovering new places and people! 🙂

  4. I’m so happy for you to have found a garden club! I think your world just expanded! New people, new broader community and many new experiences like this wonderful winter farmer’s market. I am going to enjoy seeing how you reinvent your interests and hobbies to suit a whole new environment! It’s quite exciting. Your hydrangea and the little green shoots will probably surprise you and do very well…they’ll wait for you! I think you’ll find that hydrangeas will grow year-round in Florida. I am sure you already know that, but it will be fun to see how differently many of your favorites perform with all that sunshine and humidity! I hope you have a good weekend. With all those great fruits and vegetables maybe you should start a cooking blog. LOL!

    • No, many plants require a cold period for dormancy. Hydrangeas, etc will not grow in south Florida. The palette of plants down here is entirely different from the rest of the continental U.S.

    • The only plants down here (Miami and south of there) that I recognize from the north are: poison ivy, button bush (Cephalanthus occidentalis), elderberry, and Acer rubrum, which can be seen growing in the central area of the everglades.

    • Hi Debra. It’s been great meeting these people who are all full of south Florida gardening advice. For them, it must feel like they’re meeting someone from another planet — a frozen one! Sadly, hydrangeas do not bloom this far south. They need a winter rest — so I’m on a mission to find a suitable replacement. Enjoy the weekend — and if I should start a cooking blog, you’ll be the first to know. 🙂

  5. Glad to hear things are going well with the move! I really wish the best for both of you.
    Those vegetables really look almost too good to eat!
    Surely there will be one or two plants that will make up for your missing hydrangeas, some people are even a little jealous of the frost free South Florida weather. If you ever start to get bored maybe you can squeeze in a visit and post on the fruit and spice park in Homestead? I visited several years ago and would love to hear your impression.

    • Hi Bittster. Thanks for the tip about the park in Homestead. I’ll be sure to visit. Right now, I’m in the homework stage of landscaping — and I spent the day yesterday at two nurseries, asking lots of questions, making lists, and thinking. It should be quite the process.

      • The 25th Annual Asian Cultural Arts Festival is at the Fruit and Spice Park on March 1 and March 2. It is in the middle of the Redland farming area. Oh, Fairchild has an orchid Festival on the following Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

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